Wednesdays with Words: A Drudgery Rather Than a Delight

Wednesdays with Words: A Drudgery Rather Than a Delight

Karen Glass, in Consider This, traces the idea of literature – of grammar – in the Classical Tradition from the ancient Greeks through the Victorian age. Originally, the idea of literature had meant the necessity of reading in the Classical Languages in Latin and Greek. She shows how the idea of grammar evolved and changed…

Wednesdays with Words: Precision of Utterance

Wednesdays with Words: Precision of Utterance

On Monday, we had our first CM Group meeting.  We’re using Brandy’s study guide, Start Here.  In it, she assigns readings from For the Children’s Sake and A Philosophy of Education. In For the Children’s Sake, Susan Schaeffer Macaulay says some pretty profound things.  One of the first, for me so apropos, is, We have to…

2015 Homeschool Changes: Narration Changes

2015 Homeschool Changes: Narration Changes

One of the similarities between Charlotte Mason and WTM is the idea of narration.  One of the big differences is how narration is done. We have done written narration as one sentence per “grade” in school for each reading.  So, first graders write one sentence.  Third graders write three.  We’ve done this for literature, science,…

2015 Homeschool Changes: To Ambleside or not to Ambleside

2015 Homeschool Changes: To Ambleside or not to Ambleside

So, here’s the first “I’m not really sure yet” post. I told you yesterday that I’ve long been intrigued by/interested in/drawn to Ambleside Online.  I’ve used their free reading lists and their annual booklists for free reads and read alouds. I know they ask you not to do this. I would like to continue to…

Wednesdays with Words: Looking Back, Looking Forward

Wednesdays with Words: Looking Back, Looking Forward

Last week I shared how Classical Education drew me at least partially because of its historical, traditional nature. The Introduction of Karen Glass’ book Consider This takes a giant leap in disabusing me of that perception. It is not possible to fully understand classical education by looking at what they did in the past–perhaps the…